Wayne State University

Ashleigh M. Day

Ashleigh

Academic Interests

Ashleigh M. Day's research interests center around crisis, organizational, and health communication as well as communicative elements of human-animal relationships. Ashleigh is passionate about woking with communities to address exigencies through partnerships, participatory research, and understanding.

Awards & Honors

2018 Graduate Student Research Award, Wayne State University, Department of Communication.

2017 Graduate Student Research Award, Wayne State University, Department of Communication.

Top Papers
‘I made decisions based on what my heart told me to, not officials': Pet owners, informational sources, media uses, and Hurricane Harvey. International Crisis and Risk Communication Conference, Orlando, FL, March 2019.

Trotting towards a new tenet: Advocating for empirical human-animal studies in communication theory and research. Communication Theory and Research interest group. Western States Communication Association Conference, Seattle, WA, February 2019.

Performance, possums, and political photo-ops too: Marginalizing binaries at the Wausau Possum Festival. Environmental Communication interest group. Western States Communication Association Conference, Salt Lake City, UT, February 2017.

Degrees and Certifications

Ph.D. Communication, Wayne State University.
M.A. Applied Communication, Northern Arizona University.
B.A. Communication, University of Arizona.

Primary Research Link

Ashleigh Marie Day on ResearchGate

Recent Publications

Journal Articles: 

Novak, J. M., Day, A. M., Sopory, P. WIlkins, L., Padgett, D., Eckert, S., Noyes, J., Allen, T. Alexander, N., Vanderford, M., & Gamhewage, G. (2019). Engaging communities in emergency risk and crisis communication: A systematic review and evidence synthesis. Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research, 2(1), 61-96. https://doi.org/10.30658/jicrcr.2.1.4

Day, A. M., O’Shay Wallace, S., Seeger, M. W., & McElmurry, S. (2019). Informational sources, social media use, and race in Flint, Michigan’s water crisis. Communication Studies. doi: 10.1080/10510974.2019.1567566

Sopory, P., Day, A. M., Novak, J. M., Eckert, K., Wilkins, L., Padgett, D. R., . . . Gamhewage, G. M. (2019). Communicating uncertainty during public health emergency events: A systematic review. Review of Communication Research, 7, doi: 10.12840/ISSN.2255-4165.019

Day, A. M. (2018). Performance, possums, and photo-ops, too: Marginalizing binaries at the Wausau Possum Festival. Western Journal of Communication. doi: 10.1080/10570314.2017.1416489

Day, A. M. (2017). Companion animals and natural disasters: A systematic review of literature. International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, 24, 81-90. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijdrr.2017.05.015

Day, A. M. (2017). Salmonella in the student union!: Applying the best practices in crisis communication in a mock crisis activity. Discourse: The Journal of the Speech Communication Association of South Dakota, 4, 61-68. Available at: https://openprairie.sdstate.edu/discoursejournal/vol4/iss1/7/

Eckert, S., Sopory, P., Day, A., Wilkins, L., Padgett, D., Novak, J., . . . Gamhewage, G. (2017). Health-related disaster communication and social media: Mixed-method systematic review. Health Communication, 1-12. doi:10.1080/10410236.2017.1351278

Book Chapters:

Day, A. M. (accepted). Systemic racism, Twitter, and a typology: A content analysis of #FlintWaterCrisis tweets. In I. Chiluwa and G. Bouvier (Eds.), Twitter: Global perspectives, uses and criticisms. New York: Nova Science Publishers.

Seeger, M. W., Reynolds, B., & Day, A. M. (accepted). Crisis an emergency risk communication (CERC): The beginnings, advancements and extant research, and the future. In W. Johansen and F. Frandsen (Eds.), Handbook of Crisis Communication (Vol. 23). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Novak, J. M., & Day, A. (2018). Families, companion animals, and the CSZ disaster: Implications for crisis and risk communication. In C. V. Fletcher & J. Lovejoy (Eds.), Natural disasters and risk communication: Implications of the Cascadia Subduction Zone megaquake (pp. 199-230). Lanham, MD: Lexington Press.

White Papers:

Sopory, P., Day, A., Novak, J., Eckert, S., Wilkins, L., Padgett, D., . . . Gamhewage, G. (2016). Evidence syntheses to support the guideline on emergency risk communication: Q5: What are the best and most generalizable emergency risk communication activities that build trust in health authorities as a source of health protection information among affected communities and other stakeholders? World Health Organization. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/risk-communication/guidance/process/systematic-reviews/en/

Padgett, D., Sopory, P., Nickell, J., Day, A., Wilkins, L., Eckert, S.,…Gamhewage, G. (2016). Evidence syntheses to support the guideline on emergency risk communication: Q7: What are the elements and steps of effective, strategic communication planning? World Health Organization. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/risk-communication/guidance/process/systematic-reviews/en/

Novak, J., Day, A., Sopory, P., Wilkins, L., Padgett, D., Eckert, S.,…Gamhewage, G. (2016). Evidence syntheses to support the guideline on emergency risk communication: Q9: What are the best ways to engage communities in emergency risk communication activities to respond to events/ contexts? World Health Organization. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/risk-communication/guidance/process/systematic-reviews/en/

Eckert, S., Sopory, P., Day, A., Wilkins, L., Padgett, D., Novak, J., . . . Gamhewage, G. (2016). Evidence syntheses to support the guideline on emergency risk communication: Q10: What are the best social media channels and practices to promote health protection measures and dispel rumours and misinformation during events and emergencies with public health implications? World Health Organization. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/risk-communication/guidance/process/systematic-reviews/en/

Sopory, P., Day, A., Novak, J., Eckert, S., Wilkins, L., Padgett, D., . . . Gamhewage, G. (2016). Evidence syntheses to support the guideline on emergency risk communication: Q11: What are the best ways to communicate uncertainties to public audiences, at-risk communities, and stakeholders? World Health Organization. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/risk-communication/guidance/process/systematic-reviews/en/

Wilkins, L., Sopory, P., Day, A., Eckert, S., Padgett, D., Novak, J., . . . Gamhewage, G. (2016). Evidence syntheses to support the guideline on emergency risk communication: Q12: What elements and timing of messages are best at influencing public/ community levels of concern to motivate relevant actions to protect health? World Health Organization. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/risk-communication/guidance/process/systematic-reviews/en/

Courses Taught

COM 1010: Oral Communication: Basic Speech
COM 3250: Introduction to Organizational Communication 
COM 3300: Business and Professional Presentations
COM 3400: Theories of Communication